Who Pays for Stolen Items?

Look around you

In the US, about one in 11 people, or 23 million people, shoplift, according to the National Association for Shoplifting Prevention (NASP). This is a group that does many things, including helping people stop shoplifting.

They aren't all professionals.

NASP says more than 10 million people have been caught shoplifting in the past five years, and one of every four shoplifters is a under the age of 18.

Two studies report that one in four teenagers between the ages of 12 and 16 have experience with shoplifting. Only about half of them get caught. When young people get caught, their friends are usually surprised.

Jonathan of Seattle recalls that during a school trip a classmate stole from a museum store. When the kid was caught, the teachers were embarrassed and the kids were "awestruck," Jonathan says. "All the kids were saying, 'why did he do that?'" and 'It was stupid to do that.'"

Wrong thinking: 'No one will find out.'
People who steal don't stop to think first about what might happen.

Why steal?

Young people (and adults) take things that don't belong to them for different reasons.

Little children age four and under may not know better. But most school-age youth know that it's wrong to take something without asking or paying for it.

There's no single reason why a person steals, but here are some of the reasons people steal:

What can you do?

Share Anonymously Feel Empowered.  Excerpted from the National Association for Shoplifting Prevention (NASP), a  non-profit organization; www.shopliftingprevention.org.
Take this quiz.

What should you do if you discover someone you know is stealing? Talk to a parent, teacher, or other adult you trust about it.

Stealing from stores may not seem like the same as getting your locker broken into or your wallet taken. But ultimately, you—and everyone else who shops—pay the price.

True or False: Andrew Jackson's home, The Hermitage, is a part of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Click Andrew's head for the answer.
TRUE: Jackson was the president who signed the Indian Removal Act into law. The National Park Service displays Jackson's home as a site on the trail where many Cherokee died from being displaced.
contributed by
Lucy

Stoughton, WI
p. 1
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GHS Federal Credit Union


What makes credit unions so great? Members like you.

Every dollar you invest in your credit union earns you money while other members borrow it.

When you're ready for a loan, other members' savings will be there to help you out at the lowest possible cost.